So first, I was impressed to see that this tutorial was created by David Wiley, as he is the founder of the high school I teach at. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJI9RShrxr4&feature=youtu.be. He is a huge advocate of OER and I’ve learned tons already in working at the Open High School of Utah, but I’m taking this course because I want to become better and finding and utilizing the best resources.

I am learning that I’ve already developed a few bad habits in searching for curriculum online by going to websites I already know and trust. I love to read up on background information at flatworldknowledge.com, then peruse the links found on the besthistorysites.net website: http://www.besthistorysites.net/index.php/american-history/1900/cold-war-era, then search things like Shmoop.com to see what else is out there.

I liked searching directly from OER commons because it tells you already (as best it can) what type of license the material has. The problem with searching there is that on a few websites, OER just says, “see fine print” and actually finding that fine print is easier said than done.

I found links to Khan Academy, which I like, but using the entire clip is too long for my students most of the time (13+ minutes). I discovered WGBH Open Vault, which in theory is great, I’m not so sure about its user-ability in practice, however (for the Cuban Missile Crisis I found an informative (albeit boring for high-schoolers) video from the Secretary of State during the 1960s.

Through OER commons, I was directed to Stanford’s Reading Like a Historian: http://sheg.stanford.edu/cuban-missile-crisis. I have already used and loved some of this stuff, but didn’t know it was CC. The OER website says to read the fine print. I of course did not see any of this fine print anywhere, so I’m still not sure how you are supposed to use it properly.

I also enjoyed stumbling upon the MIT opencourseware and other free college level classes. I think they will be more valuable for me on the teaching end and less user-friendly for the students, but I definitely want to look into those courses more.

My big, new find, was the Merlot website: http://www.merlot.org/merlot/index.htm. Very cool stuff! Again, the stuff it linked me to was hard to determine its licensing, but at least it took me to some other neat sites like these: http://www.cubacrisis.net/angl/pages/premset_01.html , http://www.cubanmissilecrisis.org/

All in all, I did some exploring and found some new tools to put in my toolkit, but I’m not sure I learned all too much about correct CC licensing.